BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER

IN CELEBRATION OF BLACK HISTORY

The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum is dedicated to discovering, collecting and sharing the African-American history and heritage of Palm Beach County. Located in the former home of the late Solomon D. Spady, the most prominent African American educator and community leader in Delray Beach from 1922 to 1957, the museum opened in July 2001 and is the only Black History Museum & Cultural Center of its kind in Palm Beach County.

Watch this short video about the Spady Living Heritage Museum from WBPF 25

A DESTINATION FOR ALL

It has become a destination for people of all cultures seeking information about Florida’s early black communities and culture. The museum has exhibited a series of shows, highlighting the talents and influences of African-Americans, Caribbean-Americans and Haitian-Americans. Shows ranging from photographic galleries of founding families to contemporary shows on minorities in medicine and the arts have adorned its walls.

In addition, through its Youth Cultural Empowerment Program, Ride & Remember Trolley Tours, special events, Spady Living Heritage Festival and community forums, the museum has become a community hub for the exchange of ideas, art and culture.

Solomon D. Spady | Biography

MOST INFLUENTIAL AFRICAN AMERICAN IN DELRAY BEACH

Solomon D. Spady came to Delray in 1922, as the third African American public school principal/teacher assigned to Delray Beach. He came here upon the recommendation of George Washington Carver, chemist, researcher and teacher at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. His tenure lasted 35 years, during which he became one of the most influential African Americans in Delray Beach, and the house that he built for his family now acts as the central location for the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum.

Mr. Spady was born January 17, 1887 in Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia. He completed his education in the public schools there and graduated from Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in 1912. He stayed on to teach at the Institute for one year; the following year he taught physics at Virginia Union University. In 1914 he received a teaching certificate from the state of Virginia and began his career in public education in Cape Charles, Virginia. He became affiliated with the New Farmers of America, the largest black farm youth organization in the world during which time he made a lasting acquaintance of the renowned agricultural chemist, Dr. George Washington Carver.

400

YEARLY TROLLEY TOUR RIDERS

103

MEETINGS HELD YEARLY

3,200

ITEMS IN MUSEUM COLLECTIONS

340

PEOPLE ENGAGED PER MONTH

(CH15894) A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.